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Epidemiology and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Papua, Indonesia: a molecular diagnostic study.
Metadata
Journalacta tropica2.555Date
2020 Jun 04
4 months ago
Type
Journal Article
Volume
2020-Sep / 209 : 105575
Author
Kridaningsih TN 1, Sukmana DJ 1, Mufidah H 1, Diptyanusa A 2, Kusumasari RA 2, Burdam FH 3, Kenangalem E 3, Poespoprodjo JR 4, Fuad A 5, Mahendradhata Y 6, Supargiyono S 7, Utzinger J 8, Becker SL 9, Murhandarwati EEH 10
Affiliation
  • 2. Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
  • 3. Mimika District Health Authority, Timika, Papua, Indonesia; Timika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Timika, Papua, Indonesia.
  • 4. Mimika District Health Authority, Timika, Papua, Indonesia; Timika Malaria Research Programme, Papuan Health and Community Development Foundation, Timika, Papua, Indonesia; Department of Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
  • 5. Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Population Health, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
  • 6. Center for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
  • 7. Postgraduate Programme in Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Center for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
  • 8. Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
  • 9. Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland; University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany.
  • 10. Postgraduate Programme in Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia; Center for Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Nursing, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Electronic address: [email protected]
Doi
PMIDMESH
Abstract
Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic worm that is of considerable clinical relevance. Indeed, it may persist asymptomatically for many years, but can lead to potentially fatal dissemination when the host's immune status is impaired. As commonly employed stool microscopy techniques (e.g. Kato-Katz thick smear) fail to detect S. stercoralis, the epidemiology is poorly understood. In 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional household survey in the district of Mimika in Papua, Indonesia. A total of 331 individuals, aged 1 month to 44 years, had a single stool sample subjected to real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for S. stercoralis diagnosis. The prevalence of S. stercoralis infection was 32.0% (106/331 individuals); higher than any of the three main soil-transmitted helminths (Ascaris lumbricoides, 23.9%; Trichuris trichiura, 18.4%; and hookworm, 17.2%). Amongst the S. stercoralis-infected individuals, 73.6% were concurrently infected with another helminth, with hookworm being the most frequent co-infection (27.4%). Fourteen percent of the S. stercoralis infections had low cycle threshold values on real-time PCR, which may indicate a higher infection intensity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that age ≥5 years (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.1-10.8) was significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. There is a need for in-depth clinical and diagnostic studies to elucidate the public health impact of S. stercoralis infection in Indonesia.
Keywords: Diagnosis Indonesia Neglected tropical diseases Polymerase chain reaction Soil-transmitted helminths Strongyloides stercoralis
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Acta Tropacta tropica
Metadata
LocationNetherlands
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