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Mosquitoes are attracted by the odour of Plasmodium-infected birds.
Metadata
Journalinternational journal for parasitology3.53Date
2020 Jun 05
4 months ago
Type
Journal Article
Volume
2020-Jul / 50 : 569-575
Author
Díez-Fernández A 1, Martínez-de la Puente J 2, Gangoso L 3, López P 4, Soriguer R 2, Martín J 4, Figuerola J 2
Affiliation
  • 2. Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), C/Américo Vespucio 26, E41092 Seville, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Seville, Spain.
  • 3. Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC), C/Américo Vespucio 26, E41092 Seville, Spain.
  • 4. Dept. Ecología Evolutiva, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC). C/José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2. Madrid, Spain.
Doi
PMIDMESH
Abstract
Parasites can manipulate their hosts to increase their transmission success. Avian malaria parasites (Plasmodium) are thought to alter the cues such as host odour, used by host-seeking mosquitoes. Bird odour is affected by secretions from the uropygial gland and may play a role in modulating vector-host interactions. We tested the hypothesis that mosquitoes are more attracted to the uropygial secretions and/or whole-body odour (headspace) of Plasmodium-infected house sparrows (Passer domesticus) than to those of uninfected birds. We tested the attraction of nulliparous (e.g. uninfected mosquitoes without previous access to blood) Culex pipiens females towards these stimuli in a dual-choice olfactometer. We used Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses to assess whether Plasmodium infection is associated with differences in the chemical composition of uropygial secretions. Mosquitoes were more attracted to the odours of infected than uninfected birds, regardless of sex. However, the significant interaction between infection status and the stimuli (uropygial secretion or headspace) showed that mosquitoes were more attracted to the headspace of infected birds; no differences were found in the case of uropygial secretions. The compounds in the volatile lipophilic fraction of the uropygial secretion did not differ between infected and uninfected birds. These results support the host manipulation hypothesis since avian Plasmodium parasites may be capable of altering their host's body odour, thereby making infected individuals more attractive to mosquitoes.
Keywords: Chemical communication Host preference Infectious diseases Olfaction Olfactometer Wild birds
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3.5
Int J Parasitolinternational journal for parasitology
Metadata
LocationEngland
FromELSEVIER SCI LTD

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