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Auditory Fear Conditioning Alters Sensitivity of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex but this is not based on Frequency-dependent Integration.
Metadata
Journalneuroscience3.056Date
2020 Jun 05
4 months ago
Type
Journal Article
Volume
2020-Aug-21 / 442 : 237-252
Author
Xie H 1, Wu D 2, Gao X 2, Wang N 3, Xiao Z 4
Affiliation
  • 2. Department of Neurology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China.
  • 3. Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Psychiatric Disorders of Guangdong Province, Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area Center for Brain Science and Brain-Inspired Intelligence, Key Laboratory of Mental Health of the Ministry of Education, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 4. Department of Physiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Psychiatric Disorders of Guangdong Province, Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area Center for Brain Science and Brain-Inspired Intelligence, Key Laboratory of Mental Health of the Ministry of Education, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China. Electronic address: [email protected]
Doi
PMIDMESH
Abstract
Although many studies have shown that the prelimbic (PL) cortex of the mPFC is involved in the formation of conditioned freezing behavior, few have considered the acoustic response characteristics of PL cortex. Importantly, the change in auditory response characteristics of the PL cortex after conditional fear learning is largely unknown. Here we used in vivo cell-attached recordings targeting the mPFC during the waking state. We confirmed that the mPFC of adult C57 mice have neurons that respond to noise and tone in the waking state, especially in the PL cortex. Interestingly, the data also confirmed that these neurons responded well to the intensity of sound but did not have frequency topological distribution characteristics. Furthermore, we found that the number of c-fos positive neurons in the PL cortex increased significantly after auditory fear conditioning. The auditory-induced local field potential recordings and in vivo cell-attached recordings demonstrated that the PL cortex was more sensitive to the auditory conditioned stimulus after the acquisition of conditioned fear. The proportion of neurons responding to noise was significantly increased, and the signal to noise ratio of the spikes were also increased. These data reveal that PL neurons themselves responded to the main information (sound intensity), while the secondary information (frequency) response was almost negligible after auditory fear conditioning. This phenomenon may be the functional basis for handling this type of emotional memory, and this response characteristic is thought to be emotional sensitization but does not change the nature of this response.
Keywords: auditory fear conditioning cell-attached clamp recording emotional sensitization local field potential recording medial prefrontal cortex threat
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Neuroscienceneuroscience
Metadata
LocationUnited States
FromPERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD

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