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Blood factors transfer beneficial effects of exercise on neurogenesis and cognition to the aged brain.
Metadata
Journalscience41.845Date
2020-07-10
Publication Type
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Journal Article
Volume
2020-07-10 / 369 : 167-173
Author
Horowitz AM 1, 2, Fan X 1, Bieri G 1, Smith LK 1, 2, Sanchez-Diaz CI 1, Schroer AB 1, Gontier G 1, Casaletto KB 3, 4, Kramer JH 3, 4, Williams KE 5, Villeda SA 2, 6, 7, 8
Affiliation
  • 2. Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 3. Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 4. Memory and Aging Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 5. Sandler-Moore Mass Spectrometry Core Facility, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 6. Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. [email protected]
  • 7. Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, San Francisco, CA, USA.
  • 8. Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, San Francisco, CA, USA.
Doi
PMIDMESH
Aging
Animals
Blood Circulation
Brain
Cognition
Cognitive Dysfunction
Glycosylphosphatidylinositols
Liver
Mice
Neurogenesis
Phospholipase D
Physical Conditioning, Animal
Regeneration
Signal Transduction
Abstract
Reversing brain aging may be possible through systemic interventions such as exercise. We found that administration of circulating blood factors in plasma from exercised aged mice transferred the effects of exercise on adult neurogenesis and cognition to sedentary aged mice. Plasma concentrations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-specific phospholipase D1 (Gpld1), a GPI-degrading enzyme derived from liver, were found to increase after exercise and to correlate with improved cognitive function in aged mice, and concentrations of Gpld1 in blood were increased in active, healthy elderly humans. Increasing systemic concentrations of Gpld1 in aged mice ameliorated age-related regenerative and cognitive impairments by altering signaling cascades downstream of GPI-anchored substrate cleavage. We thus identify a liver-to-brain axis by which blood factors can transfer the benefits of exercise in old age.
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41.8
Sciencescience
Metadata
LocationUnited States
FromAMER ASSOC ADVANCEMENT SCIENCE

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