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Bacterial co-infections with SARS-CoV-2.
Metadata
Journaliubmb life3.244Date
2020 Aug 08
a month ago
Type
Review
Journal Article
Volume
2020-Aug-08 / :
Author
Mirzaei R 1, 2, Goodarzi P 3, Asadi M 4, Soltani A 5, Aljanabi HAA 4, 6, Jeda AS 7, Dashtbin S 8, Jalalifar S 8, Mohammadzadeh R 8, Teimoori A 9, Tari K 2, 10, Salari M 2, 10, Ghiasvand S 1, Kazemi S 1, Yousefimashouf R 1, Keyvani H 7, Karampoor S 7
Affiliation
  • 2. Student Research Committee, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
  • 3. Faculty of Pharmacy, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • 4. Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • 5. School of Basic Sciences, Ale-Taha Institute of Higher Education, Tehran, Iran.
  • 6. Alnahrain University College of Medicine, Iraq.
  • 7. Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • 8. Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • 9. Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
  • 10. Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran.
Doi
PMIDMESH
Abstract
The pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected millions of people worldwide. To date, there are no proven effective therapies for this virus. Efforts made to develop antiviral strategies for the treatment of COVID-19 are underway. Respiratory viral infections, such as influenza, predispose patients to co-infections and these lead to increased disease severity and mortality. Numerous types of antibiotics such as azithromycin have been employed for the prevention and treatment of bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infections in patients with a viral respiratory infection (e.g., SARS-CoV-2). Although antibiotics do not directly affect SARS-CoV-2, viral respiratory infections often result in bacterial pneumonia. It is possible that some patients die from bacterial co-infection rather than virus itself. To date, a considerable number of bacterial strains have been resistant to various antibiotics such as azithromycin, and the overuse could render those or other antibiotics even less effective. Therefore, bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection are considered critical risk factors for the severity and mortality rates of COVID-19. Also, the antibiotic-resistant as a result of overusing must be considered. In this review, we will summarize the bacterial co-infection and secondary bacterial infection in some featured respiratory viral infections, especially COVID-19.
Keywords: COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2 antibiotic bacterial co-infection viral infection
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