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Effect of the dopamine agonist, lergotrile mesylate, on circulating anterior pituitary hormones in man.
Metadata
Journaljournal of clinical endocrinology & metabolism5.399Date
1978-Aug
Type
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Journal Article
Trial
Trial
Volume
1978-Aug / 47 : 372-8
Author
Thorner MO , Ryan SM , Wass JA , Jones A , Bouloux P , Williams S , Besser GM
DoiPMIDMESH
Acromegaly
Adult
Double-Blind Method
Ergolines
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Growth Hormone
Humans
Hydrocortisone
Kinetics
Luteinizing Hormone
Male
Middle Aged
Pituitary Hormones, Anterior
Prolactin
Reference Values
Thyrotropin
Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone
Abstract
The effects of the ergoline derivative, lergotrile mesylate, on the serum levels of PRL, GH, TSH, LH, FSH, cortisol, and blood sugar were studied in six normal males. The effects of lergotrile mesylate on the serum levels of GH and PRL were also studied in eight patients with acromegaly and in two with idiopathic hyperprolactinemia. In the normal subjects, 2 mg oral lergotrile lowered basal PRL levels after 90 min and markedly impaired the PRL response to TRH (200 micrograms iv); the mean peak value +/- SE was 8.3 +/- 1.1 micrograms/liter, compared to the control value of 66.6 /+- 11.3 micrograms/liter. Lergotrile raised serum GH levels in five of the six subjects to peaks of 8-49 micrograms/liter, compared to 2-8 micrograms/liter after placebo. In three subjects, the GH response to lergotrile was attenuated by the prior administration of the dopamine antagonist, metoclopramide (10 mg orally). Lergotrile had no effect on FSH and LH levels under basal conditions or after the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH; 100 micrograms iv). Circulating TSH levels were unaltered basally but impaired after TRH. Blood sugar levels were unaltered; serum cortisol was elevated in five of six subjects; there was a brief depression of diastolic blood pressure, but no change in pulse rate. The side effects after lergotrile were variable, with drowsiness as a consistent feature. These actions are similar to those of bromocriptine (an ergot derivative treatment of hyperprolactinemia and acromegaly, to suppress PRL and GH secretion, and in parkinsonism. Therefore, it may be expected that lergotrile could fulfill these clinical uses; however, in the studies comparing the effects of single oral doses of lergotrile (2 mg) and bromocriptine (2.5 mg) on GH and PRL secretion in patients with acromegaly and hyperprolactinemia, lergotrile in the dose used has been found to have an earlier onset and shorter duration of action.
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J Clin Endocrinol Metabjournal of clinical endocrinology & metabolism
Metadata
LocationUnited States
FromENDOCRINE SOC

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