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Requirements for blastocyst development in vitro.
Metadata
Journaljournal of animal science2.092Date
1979
Type
Review
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Journal Article
Comparative Study
Volume
1979 / 49 Suppl 2 : 26-34
Author
Brinster RL , Troike DE
DoiPMIDMESH
Animals
Bicarbonates
Blastocyst
Carbon Dioxide
Culture Media
Glucose
Growth
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
In Vitro Techniques
Mice
Osmolar Concentration
Oxygen
Pyruvates
Pyruvic Acid
Rabbits
Abstract
Four characteristics of culture medium that are important to embryo development and nutrition of the blastocyst have been discussed. An examination of several of the most commonly used media for embryo culture demonstrates many similarities among them. The milliosmolarities of the media range from the hypoosmotic optimums (256 milliosmols) demonstrated in several in vitro studies to the physiologic range (308 to 315 milliosmols). Media between these extremes generally allow good development. Low oxygen concentrations (5%) in the culture environment allow somewhat better development of early cleavage stages, but recent studies suggest the difference between development in 5 and 20% oxygen to be less than originally thought. The media most commonly employed for early embryo culture contain bicarbonate as the buffer, but maintenance of pH is probably not the most crucial role of the CO2-bicarbonate content of the media. Likewise, since 1965 almost all media used to culture embryos have used pyruvate as the primary energy source. This is particularly important when early stages, before blastocyst development, are cultured. The concentration used generally falls within the optimum range of 2.5 to 5.0 X 10(-4)M first reported. Although glucose is not oxidized well by the early cleavage stages, it is an important energy source for all blastocysts. Furthermore, glucose contributes more than any other carbon source, including amino acids, to protein formation. Much is yet to be learned concerning the nutrition of the blastocyst, but our knowledge has increased immensely during the last 15 years. Hopefully our progress will be at least as rapid in the coming decade.
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J Anim Scijournal of animal science
Metadata
LocationUnited States
FromOXFORD UNIV PRESS INC

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